Collision coverage is very important for protecting your vehicle against the financial loss that comes with physical damage to your vehicle. It's not hard to get into an accident. When an accident happens, someone is always at fault, and that could be you. Collision insurance will cover damage from a collision with another vehicle, tree, pole, guardrail and most other possible roadway hazards.

USAA maintains a strong financial standing and ranked the highest of our top picks with Consumer Reports and J.D. Power. This means you won’t have to worry about settling up financially with the company, and you’ll likely have a decent time maneuvering through its claims process. If you or anyone in your immediate family is an active or retired service member, you should definitely give USAA a call and get a quote.

Collision and comprehensive insurance are two optional types of auto insurance where your insurer pays for repairs to your vehicle. While there are other optional auto insurance coverages, liability, comprehensive, and collision are three of the most common. These coverages work hand-in-hand to repair or replace most of the damages to your car. It's important to know the difference, and make sure you're adequately covered.
You pay a monthly or yearly fee in exchange for protection against the costs associated with vehicle damage or bodily injury resulting from a collision and certain other circumstances. If your car sustains damage in an accident, you will file a claim with your car insurance company, and they will pay you the amount specified in your policy minus your deductible. If you’re determined to be at-fault in an accident, your premium may go up. 
Texas is one of four states that have seen the highest increase in auto insurance premiums over the last seven years, according to Consumer Reports. While part of that jump is due to increased repair costs for the added technology in new cars, extreme weather also plays a role, with Hurricane Harvey a recent glaring example. Over half a million vehicles flooded in Texas during that storm, significantly raising insurers’ annual losses for 2017, and in turn causing around an 8% jump in premiums this year. Add the fact that Texas is No. 1 in the nation for hail damage losses, and its position at the top of the rate hike leaderboard is no surprise.

When you apply for auto insurance in Texas, providers are legally required to offer $2,500 in Personal Injury Protection coverage (PIP). This type of coverage is mandated in so-called “no-fault” states, but it’s optional in Texas (although you do have to refuse it in writing). If you select it, 100% of the coverage amount will be available for your medical bills following an accident, regardless of who was at fault. While you may be covered under your own health insurance for those costs, PIP has the added benefit of covering up to 80% of your lost income if you’re unable to work following an accident. It’s a nice protection, but keep in mind that $2,500 won’t go that far in such a case. While most companies will let you raise the limit, it’s one of the costlier options to add, so if you’re on a budget, you’ll have to weigh its value against things like comprehensive and UM/UIM coverage.
Progressive is another solid option for Texans, but it lags slightly behind our top picks in both financial strength and claims satisfaction ratings. The differences are pretty minor, but they make it hard to justify Progressive over State Farm or Allstate on the basis of anything except price, which was about average. We did like how easy it was to get a quote through the website, though, and Progressive was one of the only companies we looked at to provide a Live Chat option.
How much car insurance you need depends on how much coverage you are legally obligated to get, as well as how much coverage you need for your situation. Each state has certain legal requirements for car insurance, and not meeting them can result in negative consequences. Check out our car insurance state guides to see the legal car insurance minimums in your state.
Any car insurance comparison tool you look at should have your state’s minimum car insurance requirements pre-loaded into its options. States requiring PIP or medpay are generally referred to as “no-fault” states, meaning that when injuries occur, each driver in a crash makes a claim with their own insurance company to pay for them. Beyond the PIP or medpay limit, the at-fault driver’s liability insurance kicks in to cover the rest.
Collision insurance is a coverage that helps pay to repair or replace your car if it's damaged in an accident with another vehicle or object, such as a fence or a tree. If you're leasing or financing your car, collision coverage is typically required by the lender. If your car is paid off, collision is an optional coverage on your car insurance policy.
The main difference between collision and comprehensive coverage comes down to the question of what the driver controls. Collision insurance will cover events within a motorist's control or when another vehicle collides with your car. Comprehensive coverage generally falls under "acts of God or nature," or things that are typically out of your control when driving. These can include events such as a spooked deer, a heavy hailstorm, or a carjacking.
Let's use the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy as an example to illustrate the differences between collision and comprehensive. Within that storm, let's consider two events that might have happened: 1) a heavy tree branch fell on your car, or 2) you swerved to avoid a falling tree branch and wound up crashing into a tree. In the first event, you had no control over when or why a tree branch would fall on your car. This kind of accident would get reimbursed under your comprehensive policy. In the second situation, you were driving the car and ultimately swerved into the tree, which makes it a collision, and collision insurance therefore pays for the damages. Events like the hypothetical ones stated above are why it's important to differentiate between the two types of coverage.
To help you figure out if you should purchase collision coverage, you should estimate the approximate value of your vehicle. While there are a number of online resources that can help with this, including Kelley Blue Book, we recommend you speak with a State Farm® agent. In addition to helping you determine the value of your vehicle, our agents can tell you how much extra you'd pay to add collision coverage.

You pay a monthly or yearly fee in exchange for protection against the costs associated with vehicle damage or bodily injury resulting from a collision and certain other circumstances. If your car sustains damage in an accident, you will file a claim with your car insurance company, and they will pay you the amount specified in your policy minus your deductible. If you’re determined to be at-fault in an accident, your premium may go up. 
You pay a monthly or yearly fee in exchange for protection against the costs associated with vehicle damage or bodily injury resulting from a collision and certain other circumstances. If your car sustains damage in an accident, you will file a claim with your car insurance company, and they will pay you the amount specified in your policy minus your deductible. If you’re determined to be at-fault in an accident, your premium may go up. 
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